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Paul McGrath advises clients across a broad range of industry sectors in all areas of contentious and non-contentious UK employment law. His practice covers all aspects of UK employment legislation and day-to-day employment matters, including appointments and terminations, employment status and worker classification issues, employee handbooks and policies, employee data privacy, disciplinary and grievance issues, and restructuring and redundancy exercises. Read Paul McGrath's full bio.

A new obligation has been introduced requiring large commercial organisations operating in the United Kingdom to publish a “slavery and human trafficking statement” at the end of each financial year.

The requirement extends to all commercial organisations in any part of a group structure (wherever incorporated, and whether a company or a partnership) that carry

Background

UK legislation provides that, when a UK employer proposes to make redundant 20 or more employees at one establishment within a period of 90 days or less, the employer is required to collectively consult representatives of those affected, prior to implementing that proposal. Failure to do so can lead to the employer being required

From today, 1 October 2014, employees and agency workers who have a “qualifying relationship” with a pregnant woman or her expected child are entitled to take unpaid time off during working hours to accompany the woman to two antenatal appointments.

This new right supplements the existing right of pregnant women to paid time off for

Departing employees can represent a significant threat to UK business.  This is particularly so in the case of senior managers and employees who have access to confidential information or who exert influence over key relationships with actual or prospective customers, suppliers or key members of staff.

Many employers seek to manage this threat by obtaining

The compensation limits on Employment Tribunal awards and certain other amounts payable under UK employment legislation will increase as of 6 April 2014. The key changes are set out below.


What Does This Mean for Employers
?

The changes will take effect on 6 April 2014 and will be applicable to dismissals taking effect on