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Katie Clark has significant experience advising on all aspects of contentious and non-contentious employment matters. Katie’s client base spans multiple business sectors and includes global corporations, financial institutions, FTSE 100 companies, manufacturing companies, service providers and start-ups. Katie is noted for her commercial approach to assisting clients to deal with employment issues ranging from day-to-day employee relations, to negotiating public limited company (PLC) board director contracts and significant business restructuring. Read Katie Clark's full bio.

Current indications are that 2017 may be a fairly static year as regards to employment law.

Whilst it is anticipated the government will trigger Article 50 to start Brexit negotiations, these are likely to last for at least two years, and existing employment laws are unlikely to feel any ripple effect from leaving the European

As you may have seen from the extensive press coverage, the UK Employment Tribunal has delivered its much anticipated judgment in Aslam and Farrar v Uber. The case was about whether Uber drivers are self-employed contractors, or are “workers” with rights to minimum wage, statutory holidays, sick pay and breaks, amongst other workers’ rights.

The government has published its response to feedback received on its proposals to simplify the taxation of termination payments, expected to come into force in April 2018.

The following table sets out the main proposals and the effect these will have on employers. Importantly, there is no change to the current £30,000 tax free allowance.

Don’t panic. The United Kingdom will continue to be an EU Member State until procedures are completed for exiting the European Union, which is likely to be at least two years. Until a withdrawal agreement is reached, EU laws and treaties will still apply, including the right for EU nationals to work in the United

A new obligation has been introduced requiring large commercial organisations operating in the United Kingdom to publish a “slavery and human trafficking statement” at the end of each financial year.

The requirement extends to all commercial organisations in any part of a group structure (wherever incorporated, and whether a company or a partnership) that carry

The English Court of Appeals ruled that UK court has jurisdiction over UK executive’s lawsuit involving a U.S.-based stock option plan, despite the stock option plan’s clear language requiring Massachusetts choice of law and jurisdiction. Multinational companies sponsoring broad-based employee plans should be on notice that non-EU exclusive jurisdiction clauses may not be enforceable against