Understanding the Federal Court Injunction against the DOL’s Revised Overtime Rule and Determining What to Do Next

A federal district court judge in Texas issued an order granting a temporary injunction late Tuesday against the Department of Labor’s new overtime exemption rule that was scheduled to take effect December 1. This article contains some practical tips on what employers should do next.

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Acquisition Strategies for ESOP Companies

ESOPs have long provided an exit strategy for owners of privately held businesses and a platform for management buyouts. Mergers and acquisition (M&A) advisors increasingly look to leverages ESOPs to accomplish both conventional stock and asset acquisitions.

Once an ESOP company decides to pursue an acquisition opportunity, it will generally structure in one of three ways. As more fully described below, the acquiring company will (1) buy the stock or the assets of the target division or company; (2) merge with the target; (3) have the target create a new ESOP, sell the target to the newly created ESOP, and then merge the ESOP that purchased the target with the acquiring company’s existing ESOP.

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Trump’s Obamacare: What Employers Can Expect

In the aftermath of the recent election of Donald Trump as president of the United States and the Republicans’ retention of control over both the House and the Senate, many are beginning to assess the impact of a Republican controlled Congress and presidency on the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

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This article was published on CFO.com, November 16, 2016.

UK Employment Alert: Uber Drivers Uber Happy

As you may have seen from the extensive press coverage, the UK Employment Tribunal has delivered its much anticipated judgment in Aslam and Farrar v Uber. The case was about whether Uber drivers are self-employed contractors, or are “workers” with rights to minimum wage, statutory holidays, sick pay and breaks, amongst other workers’ rights.

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ERISA Basics National Institute: Section 401(k) Plans

A 401(k) plan has a qualified cash or deferred arrangement that is part of a profit sharing plan or stock bonus plan. Under the Internal Revenue Code Section 401(k)(2), an employee may elect to make contributions to the plan, the covered employee’s contributions are not distributable before severance from employment, disability, death, attainment of age 59 ½, financial hardship, or termination of the plan, and under which the covered employee’s contributions are nonforfeitable.

This presentation will address the following objectives:

  • Who gets the money?
  • What money do they receive?
  • Where does the money go?
  • When do they get the money?
  • How is the money administered?

View the presentations slides.

How Congress, President-Elect Trump Might Proceed on Promise to Repeal, Replace ACA

President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This campaign promise, which echoes a familiar refrain from Republicans since ACA’s passage, is more complex than it may seem.

There are pathways to quickly “repealing” key elements of ACA such as the individual mandate and its subsidies, but this could result in significant market disruption in the absence of a replacement. Republicans will now be in charge of putting together a health reform replacement package; what that replacement will look like is an open question.

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Payroll Get Ready — Employers Face New January 31st Filing Deadline for W-2 and 1099-MISC Forms

Beginning with W-2 forms filed with respect to 2016 wages, a new law requires employers to file the government copy by January 31, 2017, for both paper and electronic copies. The accelerated deadline also applies to 1099-MISC forms for independent contractors.

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Protecting Defined Contribution Plan Retirement Savings During Disability

As employers have moved away from traditional defined benefit plans toward defined contribution plans as the primary retirement savings vehicle for their employees, much has been written about the risks of shifting the retirement savings burden from the employer to the employee. One widely-recognized consequence of this shift in retirement savings methods is that many employees are not contributing enough of their income, or earning high enough returns on their investments, to provide sufficient funds to meet their retirement needs through defined contribution plans. Many plan sponsors have responded to this concern by adding features to their defined contribution plans, such as automatic enrollment, automatic annual increases of employee deferral percentages and increased matching contributions, in order to encourage employees to save more for retirement.

Another consequence of this shift to defined contribution plans that has received less attention is that employees who suffer long-term disability are left without the retirement safety net that often has been provided under defined benefit plans. Employees typically lose the ability to continue making contributions to a defined contribution plan upon becoming disabled and often rely on their retirement savings under a defined contribution plan to meet their current income needs. While the Internal Revenue Code (the Code) and the regulations thereunder provide a framework for incorporating long-term disability benefits into defined contribution plans, these benefits have yet to become widely adopted by plan sponsors, perhaps partially due to inconsistent guidance from the Internal Revenue Service (the IRS) and uncertainly on the part of plan sponsors regarding how such benefits can be implemented in practice. However, as employers continue to limit, and in some cases terminate, defined benefit plans, it will become more pressing to turn these theoretical frameworks into workable solutions to provide an important benefit for disabled employees.

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An Overview of the New Section 457(f) Regulations

On June 22, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued proposed regulations under Section 457(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (Code). These long-awaited regulations were first previewed in IRS Notice 2007-62. In that Notice, the IRS announced its intention to issue proposed regulations that would harmonize the rules for deferred compensation plans of tax-exempt organizations (and state and local governments) under Section 457(f) with the then-new special rules for all deferred compensation arrangements under Section 409A. After nine years, the proposed regulations now issued address three principal issues, although with some unexpected changes and opportunities.

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