Elvira Kras Elvira Kras

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Elvira Kras focuses her practice on employment litigation and counseling. She defends employers in all stages of litigation including in putative class action and single and multi-plaintiff lawsuits for claims of meal and rest period violations, failure to pay wages and bonuses, off-the-clock work, misclassification, discrimination, retaliation, wrongful termination, trade secret, and breach of contract matters. She advocates for clients in federal and state courts and administrative agencies, including in proceedings before the Department of Fair Employment and Housing, the Public Employment Relations Board, the Division of Labor Enforcement Standards, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the US Department of Labor. Read Elvira Kras's full bio.

5 Questions Employers Are Asking about California Pay Data Law


By on Mar 30, 2021
Posted In Employment, Labor

Known as SB 973, the law requiring California employers with more than 100 nationwide employees to submit certain wage information to the state was signed into law in September with the first annual reporting deadline set for March 31. Businesses covered by the law must submit W-2 wage information and hours worked for their California...

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What’s Expected in Employment Law in 2021?


By , , , and on Feb 3, 2021
Posted In Employee Benefits, Employment, Health and Welfare Plans, Labor, Privacy and Data Security

Last year ended as an unprecedented and historic year, with far-reaching effects across diversity, equity and inclusion, employment practices and workplace standards. In a recent article for International Law Office, partners from McDermott’s Employment group highlight what changes are expected in 2021 and how these may affect employers and employees. Access the article.

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Buyers’ Immunity Under Employment Law Is a Myth


By on Jul 17, 2019
Posted In Employment

There are three focal points in every successorship case: (1) notice to the purchaser; (2) continuity of the business; and (3) the ability of the seller to provide relief. Reading the tripartite test for successor liability, it is enticing to conclude that a deal is safe. This is what the Greeks called hubris. Remember Oedipus,...

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