Consolidated Appropriations Act
Subscribe to Consolidated Appropriations Act's Posts

COVID-19 Stimulus Package Significantly Expands CARES Act Employee Retention Tax Credits

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, which became law on December 27, 2020, makes significant changes to the employee retention tax credits available under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (the CARES Act). The changes are generally designed to increase the availability, scope and amount of the credits. Significantly, employers that received a Payroll Protection Program (PPP) loan (or that were related to employers that received a PPP loan) may be able to claim the credit, including retroactively for periods beginning as early as March 13, 2020.

Access the article.




Consolidated Appropriations Act: Health and Welfare Benefits Provisions

The Consolidated Appropriations Act (the Act) was signed into law by the president on December 27, 2020, and includes significant health and welfare benefits provisions that affect group health plans and health insurance issuers. The Act is the most comprehensive single piece of legislation to impact group health plans since the Affordable Care Act.

Access the article.




Healthcare and Childcare FSA Fix for 2021, Finally: Special Carryover Rules and More

The Consolidated Appropriations Act provides tax relief for workers who socked away pre-tax money into flexible spending accounts (FSAs) for 2020 and couldn’t use it because of the coronavirus pandemic. Now employees may be able to carry over all of their unused funds to use later. Even ex-employees might get more time to spend down unused money instead of forfeiting it.

In a recent article in Forbes, McDermott partner Jacob Mattinson speaks to the employer perspective on FSA carryovers.

Access the article.




Cadillac Tax Delayed to January 1, 2020; Extension of ACA Health Plan Information Reporting Due Dates

Recent year-end delays to important Affordable Care Act requirements have given employers and other stakeholders much needed reprieve. President Obama signed into law a two-year delay of the Cadillac Tax on December 18, 2015.

This two-year delay is part of Congress’s $1.8 trillion omnibus spending deal, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016. In addition, the IRS recently announced a delay in health information reporting requirements for 2015 Forms 1094 and 1095.

Read the full article.




STAY CONNECTED

TOPICS

ARCHIVES