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FTC Final Noncompete Rule: Game Plan Checklist

With the Federal Trade Commission’s Final Rule that would ban noncompetes nationwide set to go into effect on September 4, 2024, assuming pending litigation doesn’t cause any delays, employers should begin planning now to address any potential compliance concerns. Legal and human resources teams will need to consider the impact of the Final Rule on current noncompete agreements, requirements for providing notice to impacted employees under the rule, and strategies for implementing pending and future agreements if the rule is upheld.

Download our checklist to help you prepare.




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Recording and Key Takeaways: FTC’s Final Noncompete Rule: Developing Your Game Plan

During this recent webinar, McDermott Partners Andrew Liazos, Brian Mead and Heidi Steele discussed what employers should consider in the evolving landscape of noncompete agreements. With the Federal Trade Commission’s Final Rule that would ban noncompetes nationwide set to go into effect on September 4, 2024, assuming pending litigation doesn’t cause any delays, employers will want to develop a game plan to navigate these issues both in the short and long term.

Watch the recording and read our key takeaways here.




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FTC Amends Health Breach Notification Rule to Regulate Health Apps and Expand Breach Notification Requirements

On April 26, 2024, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a final rule to amend its Health Breach Notification Rule (HBN Rule). The HBN Rule works as a compliment and counterpart to the breach notification requirements established under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) for HIPAA-regulated entities. Specifically, the HBN Rule requires that vendors of personal health records (PHRs) and related entities that are not covered by HIPAA notify individuals, the FTC and, in some cases, media outlets of a breach of unsecured personally identifiable health data. Stakeholders should carefully review the final rule to understand how organizations will be impacted.

Read more here.




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Washington State Further Restricts Noncompetition Agreements

The state of Washington has placed additional restrictions on the use of noncompetition agreements. Readers may be familiar with the Federal Trade Commission’s latest noncompete rule, which goes into effect on September 4, 2024. While that federal regulation is currently being challenged in court, Washington’s rule has already gone into effect.

Read more here.




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Key Takeaways From the FTC’s Final Noncompete Rule: What It Means and Next Steps for Employers

During a recent webinar, Paul HughesBrian Mead and Katharine O’Connor shed light on pressing questions about the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) rule preventing all employers from using noncompete clauses. They explained the impact of the Final Rule on current noncompete agreements, examined the legal issues around enforcing a noncompete ban and ensuing litigation, and outlined what employers should do next.

Access the recording and key takeaways.




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Revisiting Trade Secret Strategies Following the FTC Ban on Noncompete Agreements

On April 23, 2024, in a move that will have significant ramifications for employment contracts and intellectual property (IP) rights, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a rule banning all future noncompete agreements nationwide with limited exceptions. The rule marks a pivotal moment for trade secret protection and enforcement strategies as it promises to reshape the relationship between employers and employees and impact safeguards for proprietary information.

Noncompete agreements have long been used to temporarily restrict employees from working for a competitor or starting a competing business after leaving an employer. These agreements are often used to protect a company’s IP by prohibiting employees from taking and/or disclosing proprietary information, such as customer lists, to competitors.

Read more here.




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FTC Issues Rule Banning Worker Noncompete Agreements

On April 23, 2024, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted 3-2 along party lines to ban all new noncompete agreements nationwide and render existing noncompete agreements binding most workers unenforceable. The Final Rule, slated for publication in the Federal Register, provides that employers’ use of noncompete agreements amounts to an “unfair method of competition” that runs afoul of Section 5 of the FTC Act.

Read more here.

COMING UP

For a deeper dive, join our multidisciplinary team of employment and antitrust lawyers for a webinar covering what employers need to know about the Final Rule and what to do next.

FTC’s Final Noncompete Rule: What It Means and Next Steps for Employers
Wednesday, May 8, 2024
Webinar | 2:00 – 3:00 pm (EDT)

Register for the webinar here.




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2024 Chart of Healthcare Regulations

During this election year, McDermottPlus is actively monitoring annual regulations that federal agencies are expected to release, as well as “ad hoc” regulations that will be released at the discretion of federal agencies.

This chart displays health-related regulations that may be issued this year, organized by federal agency and date of potential release.

Access the chart.




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FTC Proposes Health Breach Notification Rule Amendments

At a recent open Commission meeting, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted unanimously to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to amend the Health Breach Notification Rule (HBNR). The FTC’s proposed amendment aims to codify the HBNR’s application to digital health and mobile technologies. However, several aspects of the proposed amendment lack clarity and are likely to cause confusion unless further clarified through the ongoing rulemaking process.

Read more here.




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Washington State Legislature Passes My Health My Data Act

The My Health My Data Act in Washington State (the Act) is expected to be signed into law by Governor Jay Inslee this year, after being passed by both the Washington Senate and House in different versions. Unlike recent state privacy laws, the Act specifically targets consumer health data that is not covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). It includes provisions that apply to processors and third parties who may handle a broadly defined set of consumer health data, beyond healthcare-adjacent businesses. The Act could have a significant impact on various entities, including advertisers, mobile app providers, wearable device manufacturers, healthcare companies and their data processors who handle non-HIPAA-regulated health information.

Read more here.




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