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Employers Grapple with Workers’ Off-Duty Behavior

Employees gathering with friends, expressing their political views and posting about these things on social media have created for employers an increasingly urgent question: When the people engaging in unsafe or politically charged behavior are your employees, and the conduct happens off the clock, is it appropriate or even possible to discipline them? Access the article.

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Making a Splash in the Global Employment Pool: The Challenge of Multiple Employment Laws

US businesses expanding abroad, and international businesses moving into the United States, can find the differences between employment laws both unexpected and costly. Companies of all sizes are eager to expand their businesses, and their workforce, into new markets. US employers already know that operating in multiple states can feel like operating in different countries because of state- and locality-specific employment laws. But if operating in California versus Wyoming is comparing pools to puddles, then operating in the United States versus other countries is comparing puddles to oceans. US-based companies looking to expand abroad, and foreign companies opening their first US locations, must proceed with caution before jumping in. One error can commit a business to employing its workforce until retirement, cost months and a small fortune to terminate the employment relationship, or keep it embroiled for years in class action litigation. Access the full...

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Illinois Appellate Court Decision Requires More Than At-Will Employment As Consideration For Non-Compete Agreements

by Linda M. Doyle On June 24, 2013, the Appellate Court of Illinois (First District) issued a decision in Fifield v. Premier Dealer Servs., 2013 IL App (1st) 120327, that will make it more difficult for Illinois employers to enforce post-employment non-compete agreements against newly hired employees who are employed for less than two years and leave, for whatever reason, and join a competitor. The issue in Fifield was whether the promise of at-will employment to a new employee, without more, constitutes consideration adequate to support post-employment restrictive covenants.   Fifield lost his job after his employer was acquired but was subsequently offered employment with the successor company. As a condition to his employment with the successor company, Fifield signed a two-year post-employment non-compete agreement. The agreement contained a carve-out allowing Fifield to work for a competitor if he was fired without cause within the first year of...

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