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Marjorie Soto’s employment practice covers single-plaintiff and wage and hour class litigation. She defends employers in lawsuits alleging wrongful termination, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, and wage and hour violations. Marjorie has specialized experience working with clients in the food service, retail, materials science & engineering, staffing, and entertainment industries. She also has experience in traditional labor and pay equity best practices. Read Marjorie Soto's full bio.

Most major jurisdictions have pay equity laws, but their approach is far from uniform. Global companies need to evaluate compliance with these laws on a country-by-country basis whilst simultaneously addressing their compensation policies globally.

A sample of the rules across several countries helps to identify trends that can drive effective global policies.

Australia

The Australian Workplace Gender Equality Act of 2012 mandates equal pay for equivalent or comparable work. There are annual reporting requirements for employers with 100 or more employees. Those reports must include the following indicators: gender composition of the workforce, gender composition of governing bodies, and equal compensation between men and women.

Employers are penalised by being publicly named if they fail to lodge a public report on time, or inform employees or other stakeholders that a public report was lodged, or give the requested compliance data under the Act.


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This month, Assembly Bill 5 (A.B. 5) was signed into California law. A.B. 5 codifies the “ABC Test”—used to determine if a worker is an independent contractor—which is broader, harsher and more inclusive than the common law test with which most businesses are familiar.

A.B. 5 appears to be the death knell of convenience for

US businesses expanding abroad, and international businesses moving into the United States, can find the differences between employment laws both unexpected and costly.

Companies of all sizes are eager to expand their businesses, and their workforce, into new markets. US employers already know that operating in multiple states can feel like operating in different countries