Mary Samsa and Allison Wilkerson discussed that the majority of ERISA disclosures are in fact employee communications – many of which are viewed as “routine” by employers.  As such, plan sponsors are continually balancing the best way in which to relay complex benefit plan information in a manner to best be understood by employees but equally satisfy the applicable regimented disclosure requirements. Some key takeaways from their presentation included not only the compliance and content requirements, but methods for delivering communications to employees, traps for the unwary (i.e., inconsistent information communicated, the advantage of having these communications reviewed by legal counsel, and oversight of third parties who assist in preparing communications) and some common sense approaches for routine reviews of communications and continuing education to participants so that periodic communications are not always monumental tasks.

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The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Department of Labor (DOL) conduct different types of benefit plan audits, such as retirement plans and health and welfare plans, and for various reasons. In a presentation, Jeffrey Holdvogt and Maggie McTigue discuss IRS and DOL audit triggers, the process for each and what to do if your plan is audited. They also discuss the top audit issues and actionable steps companies can take to avoid audits and compliance issues.

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There are many different types of mergers and acquisitions (M&A) transactions, making it very important to understand the overall deal structure and process. Andrew C. Liazos presented “Mergers and Acquisitions Webinar Series Part 2: The Due Diligence Process” for the CLE Program as part of the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits and the American College of Employee Benefits Counsel. He discussed the overall architecture of a deal, including the parties involved, what drives the deal structure, where to get data, price negotiations and more. The presentation focused on specific M&A areas including pension, other retirement and executive benefits.

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In the presentation “Highlights of Record Retention Requirements Applicable to Employee Benefit Plans,” Todd A. Solomon detailed the general rules of The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). He discussed several specific record-keeping requirements for employee benefit plans and a number of general requirements that imply a duty to retain records, for example general fiduciary duties, plan distribution requirements, COBRA requirements and qualified medical child support requirements.

View the presentation slides here.

On August 2, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released revised draft Forms 1094-C and 1095-C, and draft instructions for completing these forms for the 2016 reporting year (see here). Although these are not final versions, it is important for employers to review the updates and changes from the 2015 forms and instructions as they prepare for the 2016 filings.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) created new reporting requirements under Sections 6055 and 6056 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). The new rules require an applicable large employer (ALE) to report, on IRS Forms 1094-C and 1095-C, information about offers of health insurance coverage to full-time employees (FTEs) and the provision of minimum essential coverage (MEC). The Form 1094-C is also referred to as the “authoritative transmittal.” For 2016, an ALE is generally an employer with 50 or more FTE equivalents. Under Code Section 6056, an ALE must annually file with the IRS a report listing the offers of coverage made to its FTEs during the reporting year. In addition, ALEs must furnish a related statement of coverage information to FTEs. Under Code Section 6055, employers (including ALEs) who provide MEC under self-insured plans must also report MEC information for each individual covered under the employer’s self-insured plan. ALE status is determined on a controlled group basis, and each member of the controlled group is an “ALE Member” with an independent responsibility to file a Form 1094-C and Form 1095-Cs. Generally, the reporting is required at the employer identification number (EIN) level.

Under Code Section 6055, employers that are not ALEs must report MEC information on Forms 1094-B and 1095-B. Although these forms were also revised recently, draft instructions for completing these forms have not yet been released.

Read the full article here for the upcoming changes in detail, when to file and next steps to plan for.

 

On July 11, 2016, the Department of Labor (DOL) and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced a proposal to implement significant changes to the forms and regulations that govern annual employee benefit plan reporting on Form 5500. The proposed changes, which were published in the Federal Register on July 21, 2016, would considerably increase the annual reporting obligations for nearly all health and welfare plans. The changes would also have a considerable impact on annual retirement plan reporting obligations.  For more information about the effect of the proposed changes on retirement plan sponsors, see Proposed Changes to Form 5500 Reporting Requirements May Have Significant Impact on Retirement Plan Sponsors.

The DOL is seeking written comments on the proposed changes, which must be provided by October 4, 2016. The revised reporting requirements, if adopted, generally would apply for plan years beginning on and after January 1, 2019.

Read the full article here.

On-site clinics can be a valuable addition to an employer’s overall health care strategy with respect to promoting prevention, improving quality outcomes and reducing the employer’s overall trend in health care spending. However, given the myriad laws that apply to such clinics, an employer is well-advised to develop a comprehensive legal compliance strategy in designing and implementing the structure and operation of its onsite clinic.

Read the full article here.