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Evan A. Belosa is an experienced negotiator and counselor, focusing his practice on all aspects of executive employment and compensation matters. Evan represents individuals from virtually every industry across the United States, with a specific focus on executive officers and employees at all levels of the financial services industry. He also represents institutions in all aspects of the employer/employee relationship. Evan has significant experience in the areas of executive compensation and employee benefits, and has frequently represented both management teams and employers in designing and drafting compensation structures and plans. Read Evan Belosa's full bio.

Evan Belosa, Tony Bongiorno and Andrew Liazos summarize key changes and important issues associated with Massachusetts Noncompetition and Trade Secret Law and next steps to consider as the date of effectiveness approaches.

The Massachusetts Noncompetition Agreement Act and Trade Secret Law will become effective October 1, 2018.

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Join us on Thursday, September 6 at 1:00 PM EDT for a webinar designed to address questions around the Massachusetts Noncompetition Agreement Act (the Act), signed into law by Governor Baker on Friday, August 10. The Act, which takes effect on October 1, requires all employers doing business in Massachusetts to change the way they establish and structure noncompetition agreements and related forfeiture provisions under compensation arrangements.

Our panel of lawyers focused on litigation, employment and employee benefits law from Massachusetts and other states, will discuss key aspects of this legislation, strategies and best practices. Questions that will be addressed by the panel include:

  • What changes should be made to support noncompetition agreements going forward?
  • How can a noncompetition agreement be used in connection with providing severance benefits?
  • What is the status for existing non-competition agreements? When is grandfathering available?
  • Are there other available types of agreements that can adequately protect employers’ interests?
  • Might ERISA preempt the new Massachusetts noncompetition law as related to benefit plans?
  • How will the changes to Massachusetts law impact corporate transactions?
  • How will the changes in Massachusetts law affect restrictive covenant litigation in Massachusetts courts?
  • What approaches to address the Massachusetts changes will make sense for multi-state employers?

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The Massachusetts legislature’s recent approval of a comprehensive non-competition reform bill includes significant restrictions for employers seeking to impose non-compete obligations on Massachusetts workers. The Massachusetts Noncompetition Agreement Act will become effective on October 1, 2018, leaving little time for employers to consider what actions to take to protect their business interests.

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Pay equity, the concept that gender differences should not affect compensation, is a concept easy to support, yet has been stubbornly hard to achieve. Federal law has become calcified in addressing the stubborn pay gap between men and women. State and local initiatives, along with private actors, have increasingly taken steps in the past year to address pay equity.

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The federal government’s focus on pay equity and pay data, and the passage of groundbreaking equal pay laws in a number of states, has been one of the biggest employment law developments of 2016. Litigation involving pay equity claims has also risen in the past year. Given the increased focus on pay equity from these multiple sources, employers are well-advised to examine their compensation policies and practices.  Understanding and applying the varying tests for pay equity under federal and state statutes can pose a challenge, however.

On January 24, McDermott hosted an in-depth webinar to discuss the federal Equal Pay Act; state equal pay laws; the EEOC’s pay data rule; how to conduct a pay equity study; and employer defenses to pay equity claims.

To view the archived presentation slides, please click here.

To view the archived webinar, please click here.

The federal government’s focus on pay equity and pay data, and the passage of groundbreaking equal pay laws in a number of states, has been one of the biggest employment law developments of 2016. Litigation involving pay equity claims has also risen in the past year. Given the increased focus on pay equity from these multiple sources, employers are well-advised to examine their compensation policies and practices. Understanding and applying the varying tests for pay equity under federal and state statutes can pose a challenge, however.

To learn more, please join us for an in-depth webinar on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 12:00-1:00pm EST.

Large fines have recently been imposed against public companies due to using confidentiality provisions that violate whistleblower provisions under federal securities law. Many standard confidentiality clauses in employment agreements, severance agreements, release agreements, non-compete agreements and other employment related agreements will violate these whistleblower provisions. Recently, the Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations at the US Securities and Exchange Commission announced that it is actively reviewing these agreements to determine if there are possible securities law violations.

This webinar will address the whistleblower provisions relevant to employment related agreements, the recent SEC enforcement actions, the compliance issues raised by typical confidentiality clauses and actions for employers to consider for existing and future employment related agreements.

On-demand presentation link available here.

MP4 downloadable link available here.